Tag Archive for: wyoming

Skiing

With incredible powder, epic downhill terrain and sunshine-filled days, Wyoming is a destination unlike any other. Professional and novice skiers and riders from all over the world visit Wyoming for some of the best snow in the country. You will find your perfect spot in at least one of Wyoming’s 10 ski areas.

Skijoring

Rodeo may be Wyoming’s official sport, but skijoring is the state’s unofficial winter sport. It is a uniquely Western athletic and cultural phenomenon. The sport combines two of Wyoming’s favorite pastimes: skiing and horseback riding. Join us during the winter to see for yourself!

Hot Springs

Wyoming’s natural hot springs have been revered and used by Native Americans, mountain men and early pioneers who found a welcoming oasis in the healing waters. Today, you can visit the various hot springs around the state to enjoy and relax.

Outdoor Trails

The best way to experience the winter stillness of Wyoming is to strap on a pair of snowshoes or cross-country skis, or, to explore faster, rent a snowmobile and hit the trails. A range of experiences, from guided tours to open trails, are available around the state to suit your expertise level.

Soak away the chill of winter at one of Wyoming’s natural hot springs. Photo courtesy of the Wyoming Office of Tourism

For more information on Wyoming, visit TravelWyoming.com.

Explore the stunning Bighorn Mountains under a canopy of electric color each fall when you drive the Bighorn Scenic Byway to Burgess Junction, where aspen groves set a spectacular stage for the breathtaking Cloud Peak Wilderness. In the foothills, the Welch Ranch Recreation Area includes 1,700 acres of woodland along the Tongue River, where towering cottonwoods shimmer late into the fall. At the Brinton Museum, marvel at the beautiful canopy that lines the path to the historic ranch house.

Plan your visit to coincide with the annual events at the Koltiska’s Pumpkin Patch, a great opportunity for the entire family to visit a historic ranch in beautiful Sheridan County. The 2023 WYO Winter Rodeo and epic skijoring festivities are planned for February 18-19; don’t miss your chance to experience Sheridan’s incredible winter wonderland and the wildest ride in the West.

Fall colors at Scott Centennial Park in Dayton, along the Bighorn Scenic Byway, provide a postcard-perfect scene. Photo courtesy of Sheridan County Travel & Tourism

For more information on Sheridan, visit SheridanWyoming.org.

Exploring Cody Yellowstone during its quiet season means you have two choices every day of your visit: You can see a lot of a little, or a little of a lot.

With abundant sunshine, surprisingly comfortable temperatures (we love low humidity) and plenty of snow, Cody Yellowstone in winter is an adventurer’s paradise.

Outdoor options include Sleeping Giant Ski Area, with 184 skiable acres and a terrain park constructed of materials found on the hill. In addition to being the only resort in Wyoming with “SNO-GO” bikes, Sleeping Giant has night tubing and skiing, a big New Year’s Eve party with live music, and yurt and tent rentals for groups.

If you prefer non-downhill activities, try ice skating at Homesteader Park in Powell, climbing on one of many frozen waterfalls, cross-country skiing at Wood River Valley Ski Touring Park or riding a snowmobile throughout the world-class trail system in the Beartooth Mountains.

Indoor options include watching the Yellowstone Quake Hockey Team, ice skating at the Victor J. Riley Arena, or checking out various attractions like the world-class Buffalo Bill Center of the WestHeart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center and the Cody Firearms Experience.

With abundant sunshine, surprisingly comfortable temperatures (we love low humidity) and plenty of snow, Cody Yellowstone in winter is an adventurer’s paradise. Photo courtesy of Cody Yellowstone

For more information on Cody, visit CodyYellowstone.org.

Winter is a fun time to explore Cheyenne and the surrounding areas. Just like in the summertime, bikes and brews combine to give you a chance to get outside and exercise, and then kick back and relax after a hard ride. The biggest difference is the trails are wide open to explore with fewer riders, your own little piece of paradise.

Load up your fat bike and check into a cozy Airbnb in our downtown to prepare for an epic riding experience. Curt Gowdy State Park has more than 35 miles of trails to shred during the day. When you get back to town, download the Daddy of the Malt pass from Visit Cheyenne to explore the breweries and distilleries with buy-one-get-one deals.

Work up a sweat on a fat bike and then cool off with a refreshing brew in Cheyenne. Photo courtesy of Visit Cheyenne

For more information on Cheyenne, visit Cheyenne.org.

Hobo Hot Springs in Saratoga

Soak in the healing waters of Hobo Hot Springs in Saratoga, Wyoming, and let your worries be carried away by the healing steam. Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, and always FREE. Find the perfect temperature in one of three pools.

Leaf Peeping in Carbon County

Take a drive on Carbon County’s two scenic byways, Battle Pass and Snowy Range, and discover the fall colors your soul craves! Yellows, oranges and reds line the roads and vast wide-open spaces on these byways. September and October are the best times to go leaf peeping in Carbon County.

Saratoga Skijoring in Saratoga

Discover the riveting sport of skijoring in Saratoga! Used initially as a Norwegian winter travel method, it is primarily now a competitive sport, and Saratoga does it best. Join the Saratoga Skijoring group for an annual skijoring race, generally held in February.

Snowmobiling in Carbon County

Carbon County has over 500 miles of snowmobiling, snowshoeing, dogsledding and cross-country skiing trails with powder like no other. Rent some equipment for the Saratoga Hot Springs Resort, or bring your own to explore our wide-open spaces and untamed places this winter!

Yellows, oranges and reds line the roads and vast wide-open spaces on Carbon County’s two scenic byways, Battle Pass and Snowy Range. Photo courtesy of Wyoming Carbon County

For more information on Carbon County, visit WyomingCarbonCounty.com.

Artist Point
This scenic spot in Yellowstone National Park opens to a view of Lower Yellowstone Falls and the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. Don’t forget your camera or phone to capture its magic.

Schwabacher Landing
East of the Grand Tetons, located on the banks of the Snake River, you’ll find Schwabacher’s Landing. The landing is a favorite for anglers and river rafters and provides a spectacular view of the Tetons.

Devils Tower National Monument
America’s first national monument, Devils Tower is a jaw-dropping backdrop for any photo. Sitting 867 feet above the rolling prairie, make sure you have the camera ready from a distance.

Lake Marie
Located in the southeastern part of the state, Lake Marie is a brilliant blue lake in Medicine Bow National Forest. With its pristine waters and a path circling the lake, this is a great place to stop and rest while enjoying the view.

Wild Horse Scenic Loop
Connecting Green River and Rock Springs in southwest Wyoming, this 23-mile trail is home to a herd of wild horses and Pilot Butte. With breathtaking desert landscape and a chance to encounter wildlife, we recommend a four-wheel drive vehicle to discover multiple picture-perfect stopping points.

East of the Grand Tetons, located on the banks of the Snake River, you’ll find Schwabacher’s Landing. The landing is a favorite for anglers and river rafters and provides a spectacular view of the Tetons. Photo courtesy of the Wyoming Office of Tourism

For more information on Wyoming, visit TravelWyoming.com.

Sheridan County features a pair of U.S. Scenic Byways, both of which serve as trailheads to epic adventure. The Bighorn Scenic Byway begins in Dayton, home to the stunning Tongue River Canyon, and features Steamboat Point, Sibley Lake, Shell Falls and views of the Cloud Peak Wilderness. The Medicine Wheel Scenic Byway, which begins at Burgess Junction high atop the mountain and runs toward Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, features the namesake Medicine Wheel, Porcupine, Bucking Mule and Paradise Falls, as well as hundreds of miles of untouched backcountry terrain.

Historic downtown Sheridan is home to classic American architecture, beautiful neon signs and postcard-perfect small-town charms, like 100-plus pieces of public art, King’s Saddlery, the Sheridan Inn and so much more. The Battle of Little Bighorn site is just one hour away, while six other historic battle sites are located nearby.

The Bighorn Mountains are located 3.5 hours from Yellowstone National Park to the west and 2.5 hours from Devils Tower National Monument to the east, making Sheridan County the perfect road trip destination for visitors exploring the best of the Great American West.

The Bighorn Scenic Byway begins in Dayton, home to the stunning Tongue River Canyon, and features Steamboat Point, Sibley Lake, Shell Falls and views of the Cloud Peak Wilderness (pictured). Photo courtesy of Sheridan County Travel & Tourism

For more information on Sheridan, visit SheridanWyoming.org.

Artist Point
Countless people have shot a vacation photo with the Lower Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River in the background from Artist Point. And with good reason: Lighting, framing and subject matter all converge to create a hard-to-mess-up photo. While most people believe Thomas Moran painted his famed canvas of the falls from this vantage point, he was actually on the other side of the canyon at the time.

Wapiti Valley
The road from Cody to Yellowstone’s East Gate is full of photo ops with wildlife, geology, history and architecture all represented. Look for elk (also known as wapiti) and other animals, try to spot “Laughing Pig Rock,” check out the oldest ranger station in the world’s first national forest, and learn about Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge – Pahaska Tepee. Download the TravelStorys app to get a free self-guided tour as you drive through this scenic landscape.

Summit of Dead Indian Pass
While many might not like the name, everyone will appreciate the view. At 8,071 feet above sea level, the summit of Dead Indian Pass offers views of the route the Nez Perce tribe took in 1877 as it attempted to outrun General O.O. Howard and the U.S. Cavalry. Ultimately, just a small portion of the tribe escaped to Canada.

The road from Cody to Yellowstone’s East Gate in Wapiti Valley is full of photo ops with wildlife, geology, history and architecture all represented. Photo courtesy of Cody Yellowstone

For more information on Cody, visit CodyYellowstone.org.

Whether you’re looking for a simple selfie moment or an Instagram-worthy photo showing off beautiful scenery or the hike you’re conquering, Casper has it all.

Hike along the rim of Fremont Canyon to encounter a view one might think is only available at the Grand Canyon. Visit the Tate Geological Museum for a photo with a T-Rex or a wooly mammoth named Dee! Head up to Casper Mountain for the best views overlooking the city from sunrise to sunset. Nestled into the mountain is Split Rock, home to one of the most famous, natural-born photo backdrops in town.

Casper has all of this to offer your camera lens, and we haven’t even talked about the North Platte River yet! Here you can see the winding river with mountain peaks in the background, beautiful rainbow trout trophies being held proudly, or downtown history standing tall beside its banks.

The great city of Casper has this and much more for a visitor to find, capture and remember forever.

For more information on Cheyenne, visit VisitCasper.com.

Medicine Bow Peak
Hike up the beautiful Medicine Bow Peak Trail for a breathtaking view and the perfect photo op to make all your other hiking friends jealous. This 3.2-mile trail has a moderate to challenging rating due to the incline that gives way to the outstanding view over the Snowy Range.

Saratoga Hot Springs
Relax in the healing waters at the Hobo Hot Springs in Saratoga, Wyoming. With three different natural pools with differing temperatures to choose from, you’ll be able to find the perfect pool for you. And no matter which pool you choose, you’re sure to snap that perfect hot springs photo.

Camping
With just under 15,000 people in Carbon County, our light pollution is low, making way for perfect starry night skies while camping. Set up your tent and your camera for an amazing timelapse photo of our awe-inspiring skies.

Mountain Biking
Carbon County is home to over 2 million acres of public land; finding the perfect mountain biking trail is easy. Due to our dramatic landscapes, finding a flawless backdrop for your mountain biking adventure picture will be a piece of cake.

With just under 15,000 people in Carbon County, our light pollution is low, making way for perfect starry night skies while camping. Set up your tent and your camera for an amazing timelapse photo of the awe-inspiring skies. Photo courtesy of Wyoming’s Carbon County

For more information on Carbon County, visit WyomingCarbonCounty.com.