Tag Archive for: southeast idaho high country

Southeast Idaho is full of hidden local treasures. Here are a few from each city:

  • American Falls: Attend the Free Family Birding Festival each May.
  • Pocatello: The city hosts an Art Walk in historic downtown every first Friday. Dine at the Yellowstone or Café Tuscano.
  • Fort Hall: Stop at the Shoshone-Bannock Casino Hotel or attend the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Festival, a kaleidoscope of dance, tradition and regalia every August.
  • Blackfoot: Visit the Idaho Potato Museum and enjoy an all-American burger and milkshake at Rupe’s Drive-in or sweets at the Candy Jar.
  • Lava Hot Springs: Locals and visitors love Idaho’s world-famous hot spring. Dine at Portneuf Grill & Lounge or Eruption Brewery.
  • Preston: See sites from the film “Napoleon Dynamite.” Dine at Sydney’s Restaurant, followed by Polar Bear for ice cream.
  • Soda Springs: Oregon Trail history is spread across town. Don’t miss the Applegarth Apothecary or the Main Street Diner (voted Yelp’s best diner in Idaho).
  • Bear Lake Valley: Hike the stunning Bloomington Lake Trail, followed by a raspberry milkshake.
  • Malad: Don’t miss the Malad County Fair Rodeo in August, followed by Ganache Pastry & Gelato.
  • Montpelier: Explore the National Oregon/California Trail Center, followed by El Jaliciense for mouthwatering tacos and enchiladas.

Hike the stunning Bloomington Lake Trail, followed by a raspberry milkshake, in the Bear Lake Valley. Photo courtesy of Southeast Idaho High Country

For more information on Southeast Idaho, please visit IdahoHighCountry.org.

Randy’L Teton is a Shoshone-Bannock tribal member from the Fort Hall Reservation in southeastern Idaho. Teton attended the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in art history with a minor in Native American studies.

While in college, Teton was chosen as a model for a new coin by New Mexico artist Glenna Goodacre. In 2000, the United States Mint released the new Golden Dollar coin to honor Sacajawea, a Shoshone girl from Salmon, Idaho, who guided the “Corps of Discovery” known as the Lewis & Clark Expedition of 1804-1806. Sacajawea became the first Indigenous woman on a U.S. coin, and according to the U. S. Mint, Randy’L is the youngest and only living model on U.S. currency.

Teton traveled the country promoting the Sacajawea dollar and Sacajawea’s story. One of the things she loves about promoting the Sacajawea coin is teaching others about the historical and modern history of Native Americans and breaking down common stereotypes of American Indians and women. In addition, Teton recently wrote a children’s graphic novel, “It’s Her Story: Sacajawea,” about Sacajawea’s journey from a tribal perspective.

Shoshone-Bannock tribal member Randy’L Teton posed as the model for the U.S. Sacajawea Golden Dollar, and is the youngest and only living model on U.S. currency. Photo courtesy of Southeast Idaho High Country Tourism

For more information on Southeast Idaho, please visit IdahoHighCountry.org.

During the second week of August, Native Americans gather from all across North America in Fort Hall, Idaho, for the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Festival. Held annually since 1964, the festival is rated one of the best powwows in Indian Country. The amazing handmade regalia worn during the drumming and dancing competitions and the grand entrance are filled with symbolism often handed down over generations. Activities include handgames, art shows and parades, with opportunities to purchase Indian handcrafts and food. Don’t miss the Indian Relay Races – a heart-pounding horse competition where teams compete bareback.

Bear Lake Valley is known for its bountiful and completely delicious raspberry harvest that occurs in early August. A Thursday parade kicks off Raspberry Days, followed by a fair with craft booths, rides for kids, food vendors and live music all day long. And of course, Bear Lake’s famous raspberry shake is available at the fair. Unique to Raspberry Days is the Boat Light Parade on the intense turquoise water of Bear Lake, where boats are decorated with lights.

Held annually since 1964, the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Festival is rated one of the best powwows in Indian Country. Photo courtesy of Southeast Idaho High Country

For more information on Southeast Idaho, please visit IdahoHighCountry.org.