Tag Archive for: north dakota

The natural splendor of the International Peace Garden is a hidden gem bordering North Dakota and Manitoba that some get to call their backyard or even temporary home. This 2,300-acre area is covered in over 155,000 flowers, beautiful foliage and iconic structures, and is a testament to the partnership between the United States and Canada. Hike scenic trails, hop on a kayak, camp amongst the beautiful outdoors and even snowshoe and cross-country ski in the winter.

For a touch of culture, head to the Garden’s Conservatory and Interpretive Center. Explore the new succuent and cacti garden that makes up one of the largest collections in the world with over 5,000 different species.

But you can’t travel like a local without enjoying the local businesses in the area, too. In the evening, ditch the fancy restaurants and head to Bottineau to enjoy a slice at Denny’s Pizza or a few cocktails at Marie’s on Main Street. Then head to Lake Metigoshe State Park for a sunset on the shores of the gorgeous Lake Sakakawea.

Replace the crowds with an endless feeling of nature and explore the International Peace Garden and surrounding area like a local who knows it best.

The International Peace Garden is covered in over 155,000 flowers, beautiful foliage and iconic structures, and is a testament to the partnership between the United States and Canada. Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.

Since 2001, Boppa’s has been baking fresh bagels daily in Fargo, North Dakota. Owner Frank Darko started as a baker working overnight shifts while attending Minnesota State University Moorhead, where he earned a degree in health care administration. Despite working in various local companies, Darko maintained his passion for baking, often enduring long days juggling jobs with his love for bagels.

In 2016, he seized the opportunity to take ownership of Boppa’s Bagels from the original owner. This marked a new chapter for the business, with Darko envisioning growth and expansion. In February 2024, they celebrated the opening of their second location, offering customers an array of 30 different bagel varieties and 18 flavors of cream cheese, as well as sandwiches and soups. Boppa’s Bagels has become a beloved fixture in the community, renowned for its delicious offerings and welcoming atmosphere, often praised as superior to even New York’s iconic bagels.

Boppa’s Bagels has become a beloved fixture in the Fargo community, renowned for its delicious offerings and welcoming atmosphere, often praised as superior to even New York’s iconic bagels. Photo courtesy of Visit Fargo-Moorhead

For more information on Fargo-Moorhead, visit www.VisitFargoMoorhead.org.

Patricia Mabin is the founder of Pemmican Patty Food Company, a North Dakota Native American-owned business. Her goal is to support healthy lifestyles, while preserving Metis and Ojibway traditions.

Growing up outside the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation, she felt disconnected from her culture, and she desired to reconnect with her roots and share them with others. After working entry-level, low-paying jobs all her life, she wanted something more meaningful that would honor her mother’s advice to be proud of her Native American and Metis heritage. She also wanted to honor the entrepreneurial spirit her people showed when they adapted to changing circumstances and created new opportunities for themselves and future generations.

Pemmican Patty food products are inspired by family tradition; the Native ways of her grandparents and ancestors; and the desire to revive the glory of pemmican, a food that sustained her people for centuries and almost disappeared like the buffalo. Pemmican Patty products use natural ingredients that reflect her culture and history, such as maple water, bison and berries. They are healthy, clean and delicious. They also tell a story of how she carries on traditional ways and values, such as community, food sovereignty and pride in her heritage.

Patricia Mabin is the founder of Pemmican Patty Food Company, a North Dakota Native American-owned business that strives to promote cuture, health and values. Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.

January 6, 2024, marks the 105th anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt’s passing, a significant milestone in not just North Dakota’s history, but the whole nation’s. His robust conservation efforts, visionary policies and impact on the United States’ political landscapes are immeasurable and memorialized throughout North Dakota through Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Medora, and the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library, set to open in 2026.

In a different historical vein, 220 years ago in October 2024, explorers Lewis and Clark first stepped foot in North Dakota. Their journey took root in Fort Mandan, which you can still explore today. Here, they encountered the awe-inspiring beauty of the Missouri River, worked with local tribes and first met Sakakawea, who would become their guide. This exploration paved the way for westward expansion and shaped the course of American history.

2024 also marks the 120th anniversary of the White Horse Hill National Game Preserve. Today, this refuge continues to protect the natural habitat and wildlife of North Dakota, serving as a testament to the importance of conservation in preserving the state’s biodiversity and ecosystems. Here you can see bison, elk and beautiful overlooks of the area, including the nearby Devils Lake.

October 2024 will mark 220 years since explorers Lewis and Clark first stepped foot in North Dakota. This exploration paved the way for westward expansion and shaped the course of American history. Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.

Mark your calendar for the 20th Anniversary of America’s Best Small-Town Race, bringing that charming Midwest spirit to life from May 28-June 1, 2024. This week-long celebration is anything but small, featuring 50-plus live bands and an entire city rallying to keep spirits soaring.

With a lineup of seven thrilling events, including the full and half-marathon, a Friday Night 5K, the Furgo Dog Run (woof-da) and the Cyclothon, there’s something for everyone. Cap it all off with our unforgettable 27th-mile Race Party, offering music, delicious food, cold beer and endless fun. Don’t forget, our marathon course is USATF-certified and an official Boston Marathon qualifier, ensuring you have the chance to reach new heights in your running journey.

Join us for this extraordinary 20th anniversary celebration and experience the North of Normal vibe of America’s Best Small-Town Race.

The 20th anniversary of America’s Best Small-Town Race brings a week-long celebration packed full of runs, music, delicious food and cold beer. Photo courtesy of Visit Fargo-Moorhead

For more information on Fargo-Moorhead, visit www.VisitFargoMoorhead.org.

Tucked away next to the Missouri River in northeastern North Dakota, the tranquil plains of the 1800s became home for the most iconic trading posts in the West. Fort Union Trading Post was a vital location for seven different Northern Plains Tribes and Westerners. Strategically situated at the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, Fort Union became a crucial hub for commerce and cultural exchange.

Trappers and traders from various backgrounds converged here, exchanging furs, goods and stories. The fort was renowned for its diverse workforce, with individuals from numerous ethnicities and cultures working side by side. Written records describe relations there as a “bastion of peaceful coexistence” where over 25,000 buffalo robes and $100,000 in merchandise traded hands. (That’s over $2.6 billion in present day standards.) Today, you can relive this activity with living history interpretations including blacksmithing, weaving and even teepee-building. Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site stands as a well-preserved reminder of the pivotal role played by trading posts in shaping the history of the American West.

Strategically situated at the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, Fort Union was a crucial hub for commerce and cultural exchange in the 1800s. Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.

Less than 10,000 years ago, Fargo-Moorhead was 200 feet below the surface of Lake Agassiz, a vast inland sea formed at the end of the last ice age. Over centuries, the waters receded, leaving 2 meters of rich, black soil that today makes the Red River Valley one of the world’s most fertile farmlands, with Fargo and Moorhead as its center.

It may not have long ski runs or tall summits, but Fargo’s wide-open sky and flat prairie surroundings still make for some great outdoor adventures. You can kayak or fish on the Red River, or cross-country ski, golf, ice skate, bike, mountain bike or just hang out in one of Fargo’s many parks.

Dive into the history of the area by stopping by Bonanzaville USA. A history complex in West Fargo, the Cass County Historical Society Museum is made up of 40 buildings on 12 acres. Many of the buildings are historic structures from the region and have their own story. Explore the history of the Red River Valley, from Native Americans to the modernization of America.

The Cass County Historical Society Museum is made up of 40 historic buildings on 12 acres in West Fargo. Photo courtesy of Fargo-Moorhead CVB

For more information on Fargo-Moorhead, visit www.VisitFargoMoorhead.org.

Some stories are too good for the big screen. They’re for the history books.

One icy morning, a ranch hand ran to the Billings County Sheriff claiming a boat had been stolen, a severed rope and a red mitten as proof. The idea of pursuing armed and dangerous thieves on a flooded and ice-filled river was a life-threatening task. However, this sheriff lived for rugged adventures. His name was Theodore Roosevelt.

In the 1888 book “Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail,” he recounts the tale of battling the Missouri River through rolling clay buttes and zero-degree weather. When they approached the camp, Roosevelt wrote, “For a moment, we felt a thrill of keen excitement and our veins tingled as we crept cautiously toward the fire.” Using the element of surprise, all three thieves were apprehended. The trip took 36 hours and 300 miles – all for a replaceable boat – and was only made possible with Roosevelt’s undying sense of justice and need for adventure.

Stories like these tested his resolve, and are part of the reason he said, “I would not have been president if it had not been for my experience in North Dakota.” Today, you can visit the area where this happened at the Elkhorn Ranch in Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

Former U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt once said, “I would not have been president if it had not been for my experience in North Dakota.” Today, you can visit his namesake national park in the state. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.