Experience a Traditional Powwow in Wind River Country

Feel the drum beat. Hear the singing. See the colors. Admire the detailed regalia, skilled footwork and precise movements. This is all part of a Native American powwow.

In Wyoming’s Wind River Country, there are three large powwows. The Eastern Shoshone Indian Days Powwow is Wyoming’s largest. The Ethete Celebration Powwow is held in July, and the Northern Arapaho Powwow, held in September, is Wyoming’s oldest powwow.

Each powwow begins with a Grand Entry on Friday night, where elders bring in eagle feathers and flags, and all dancers enter the arena. There are also two Grand Entries on Saturday and one on Sunday.

Admission to powwows is free. Once there, you’ll find vendors selling fry bread, Indian stew and Indian tacos, as well as jewelry and other items.

Powwows today can include games, food and plenty of socializing, but the dancing remains the main event. There are traditional dances, as well as modern dances. Some are competitive, and dancers follow a powwow circuit dancing for prize money.

A powwow is an incredible way to experience the blending of the present and Wind River Country’s history. For more information, click here.

A powwow is an incredible way to experience the blending of the present and Wind River Country’s history. Photo courtesy of Wind River Country Suite 1491

For more information on Wind River Country, visit WindRiver.org.