Trout from Idaho. Bison from Wyoming and North Dakota. Beef, goat cheese and ice cream from Montana. These and other regionally sourced food products served in the dining facilities of Yellowstone National Park are bringing local flavors to the culinary forefront of the world’s oldest national park.

Today, more than 50% of the park-wide food and beverage purchases used at restaurants and other park eateries managed by concessioner Xanterra Travel Collection are categorized as sustainably produced. Xanterra’s goal is to reach 70% by 2025.

Local beverages are also well received. Xanterra serves a broad range of beers and liquors produced in the region, including Wyoming Whiskey and Backwards Distilling Company in Wyoming, Grand Teton Distillery in Idaho and Bozeman Spirits in Montana. Wyoming, Montana and Idaho are also home to some great breweries whose popular craft beers are on the menu in Yellowstone.

Yellowstone restaurants follow a simple philosophy – to provide the highest-quality food with the least environmental impact by finding products that are fresh, locally produced, organic, third-party certified and/or support sustainable farming, fishing and business practices.

More information on Xanterra’s sustainability initiatives in Yellowstone can be found here.

The dining facilities in Yellowstone National Park offer a variety of local flavors, including Milk Can Moonshine from Backwards Distilling Company in Wyoming. Courtesy Yellowstone National Park Lodges

For more information on Yellowstone National Park Lodges, visit YellowstoneNationalParkLodges.com.

South Dakota is proud to share agriculture – the state’s #1 industry – with visitors. Travelers will love exploring fields of corn, soybeans, wheat and sunflowers that stretch for miles.

In the Sioux Falls area, learn about the field-to-glass approach to brewing at A Homestead Brew, where visitors can tour a hop farm before tasting the delicious final product. Not only can travelers stretch their legs at beautiful Falls Park, they can also taste the delicious Stensland Family Farms farm-to-table cheese and ice cream at the Overlook Café before an engaging visit to the Stockyards Ag Experience.

In western South Dakota, travelers can relax in cozy cabin accommodations while enjoying the company of farm animals at the Yak Ridge Cabins & Farmstead (located near Rapid City). Farm tours are available, and visitors can learn about the sustainability of chickens, honeybees and Himalayan yaks!

With more great locations like the World’s Only Corn Palace, South Dakota Agricultural Heritage Museum, Ingalls Homestead and more, South Dakota is primed and ready to give travelers a fun and delicious agricultural experience they’ll never forget.

With locations like the World’s Only Corn Palace, South Dakota is primed and ready to give travelers a fun and delicious agricultural experience they’ll never forget. Courtesy Travel South Dakota

For more information on South Dakota, visit TravelSouthDakota.com.

Unique and unexpected, Rapid City’s Sioux Pottery features handmade collectibles created by local Native American Sioux Indian artists. Intricate pottery pieces and specialty items are formed from red clay dug up just outside of Rapid City, in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

The Paha Sapa (Black Hills) have provided food, shelter and substance for the Great Sioux Nation for decades, and the area continues to produce red clay today. Visitors to Sioux Pottery can not only purchase one-of-a-kind pottery, but also see the entire process from start to finish. Each piece is poured, shaped, fired in a kiln, sanded for finishing, painted and carved with designs and symbols important to the Lakota culture.

In 2020, Sioux Pottery was selected to participate in the Made In American Product Showcase at the White House – an annual show that highlighted American-made products from each of the 50 states.

Intricate pottery pieces and specialty items at Rapid City’s Sioux Pottery are formed from red clay dug up in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Courtesy Visit Rapid City

For more information on Rapid City, visit VisitRapidCity.com.

Farm-to-table doesn’t always mean field-to-plate – it can also mean field-to-mug, as Laughing Sun Brewery owner and brewmaster Mike Frohlich can attest. He says the beer he serves in his Biamarck taproom tastes like North Dakota because it’s “grown” there.

Frohlich says it’s important to maintain synergy between the community and state for everyone’s benefit. That’s why the barley and wheat used to create “Sinister on Oak,” “Cosmic Monk,” “Shallow Mud” and more unique brews are grown near the towns of Goodrich, Belfield and Dickinson and processed by Two Track Malting Company in Lincoln. Spent grains to the tune of about 10 tons per month are then used as feed by a local farmer. You can learn more about this unique company here.

Meanwhile, the owners of FARMtastic Heritage Foods in Anamoose call upon their Russian and Czech Republic heritage to plate up ethnic cuisine with ingredients grown locally by area producers, including the owners at their Slavic Heritage Farm. Guests come from all around central North Dakota to sample the rotating specialties. FARMtastic also conducts farm-to-table cooking classes.

The barley and wheat used to create the brews at Mike Frohlich’s Laughing Sun Brewery comes from nearby Goodrich, Belfield and Dickinson and is processed by Two Track Malting Company in Lincoln. Courtesy North Dakota Tourism

For more information on North Dakota, visit NDTourism.com.

Sustainable practices thrive in Montana, not just through ranching and farming traditions but also through many types of Montana businesses that actively incorporate these principles.

An example of what one small business can do is found at Norris Hot Springs. Located just a short drive from Bozeman, this is a popular place for families to soak in natural hot springs. It is committed to preserving natural resources by offering local and organic food, much of it grown in their “Garden of the Gods” and served in their 50 Mile Grill – appropriately named because all food served comes from within 50 miles. By reducing the distance food travels, they can provide fresh, sustainable meals that support small farmers and suppliers, boost the local economy and provide the freshest, most nutritious food available. Their commitment to sustainability continues with direct use of their natural geothermal resource to heat their café. Solar panels provide energy for the kitchen and full-hookup campsites. Their staff arranges their schedules to carpool, and they recycle and re-use their logo cups.

There are many other businesses implementing these practices while showcasing what makes their home-grown Montana products so special. We can’t wait for you to visit them.

Norris Hot Springs near Bozeman combines family fun with local and organic food; solar and geothermal power sources; and a staff committment to sustainability. Courtesy Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

For more information on Montana, visit VisitMT.com.

When your landscape is filled with rivers, mountains and agriculture, sustainability is a natural part of the lifestyle. Many Idaho businesses are looking at unique ways to preserve, recycle and maintain the beauty and resources of the state.

The Urban Worm in downtown Boise composts waste onsite for neighboring restaurants Bittercreek Alehouse, Red Feather Lounge and Diablo & Sons Saloon. Located in the basement below the restaurants, hundreds of thousands of worms work 24/7 to compost kitchen waste to create worm castings, a nutrient-rich, organic compost for gardens and houseplants.

Mill 95, the only processor of hops in Idaho, was built in 2016 in Wilder to offer fresher, premium hop pellets to brewers in Idaho and around the world. Looking toward sustainability, they began selling hop hash – the raw hop residue that collects on the back of pellet grates and often goes unused – to local breweries like Payette Brewing and Barbarian Brewing.

Elevation 486 in Twin Falls pairs beautiful Snake River Canyon views with gourmet dishes prepared with a thoughtful selection of local ingredients. Try American Kobe beef from Snake River Farms with a glass of full-bodied Syrah from Koenig Vineyards in the Snake River Valley AVA.

Below Bittercreek Alehouse, Red Feather Lounge and Diablo & Sons Saloon on 8th Street in downtown Boise, hundreds of thousands of worms work 24/7 to compost kitchen waste. Courtesy Idaho Tourism

For more information on Idaho, visit VisitIdaho.org.

You know we’re all about glamping in Western Montana’s Glacier Country, and that’s why we’re so excited to welcome two new adventure locations to the glamping family.

ROAM Beyond sets visitors up in adorable, yet sleek and modern, off-the-grid “tiny homes on wheels” that offer refined, sustainable and socially conscious lodging experiences year-round. Their concept was simple – create a mobile living experience unlike any other in the world using environmentally conscious materials, designed in a contemporary and intuitive aesthetic.

ROAM Beyond saw that people who lived for the sustainability lifestyle are searching for low environmental impact in transformational settings and decided to answer that call. Choose between their adventure basecamp in Whitefish or Columbia Falls, both located not far from the west entrance to Glacier National Park.

ROAM Beyond sets visitors up in adorable, yet sleek and modern, off-the-grid “tiny homes on wheels” that offer refined, sustainable and socially conscious lodging experiences year-round. Courtesy Western Montana’s Glacier Country

For more information on Western Montana’s Glacier Country, visit GlacierMT.com.

Living local is a major theme in Fargo, North Dakota – it’s in the food, shops, and even our community efforts.

When the city isn’t frozen, you can help yourself to produce from the Little Free Garden sites scattered through the neighborhood, or score fresh fruits and veggies, gifts and street food at Red River Market, a buzzing farmers market held July through October.

If you’re looking for a place to eat, there are many local staples to choose from. Stop by Luna Fargo – an “everyday” comfort food celebration made from scratch with the finest local, organic and sustainable ingredients – or take a break at Bernbaum’s, a bagel and sandwich shop that supports local growers and ranchers whenever possible. You’ll also find local bratwurst topped with sauerkraut at Wurst Bier Hall, pizza crust made with North Dakota wheat at Blackbird Woodfire and Fargo-grown microgreens garnishing the late night happy hour nibbles at Mezzaluna.

And when you want to kick it up a notch, sample gin, vodka and whiskey from Proof Artisan Distillers, the city’s only hometown distillery. Or try a handcrafted beer made with local barley at Drekker Brewing Company. From start to finish, you can keep it local in Fargo.

Among Fargo’s eateries is Bernbaum’s, a bagel and sandwich shop that supports local growers and ranchers whenever possible. Courtesy Visit Fargo-Moorhead

For more information on Fargo-Moorhead, visit www.VisitFargoMoorhead.org.

Did you know you can explore The Mile High City without leaving a carbon footprint?

Experience Denver’s 300 days of sunshine on tree-line sidewalks and miles of dedicated bike trails, or take a stroll or ride on the Cherry Creek Trail, which connects downtown to the Cherry Creek shopping district.

Discover more of Denver’s unique and diverse neighborhoods from the comfort of a pedicab. Sit back and enjoy the fresh air as your cruise through The Mile High City’s historic districts.

Or hop on the 16th Street MallRide – a free electric bus that travels from one end of downtown’s busting 16th Street Mall to the other, every day of the week! This mile-long promenade is the hub of activity in the city center. Step off at Denver Union Station and continue through Commons Park to the Lower Highlands neighborhood via a pedestrian bridge.

The 16th Street MallRide is a free electric bus that travels from one end of downtown’s busting 16th Street Mall to the other, every day of the week. Courtesy Rebecca Todd

For more information on the Official Gateway City of Denver, visit VisitDenver.com.

Behind a bushy beard and crinkly, smiling eyes is a distiller with a heart that beats for Wyoming. Pine Bluffs Distilling owner Chad Brown dabbled with homebrewing in the past, but the possibility using his passion to impact the rural town of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming, on a bigger scale intrigued him.

Brown began by building relationships with the grain farmers in his community and, as a result, Pine Bluffs Distilling sources its ingredients literally from next door! The distillery is surrounded by crop fields, and also houses the Wyoming Malt Company. Making malt from local grains allows them to distill a collection of farm-to-flask whiskeys well worth the 40-minute drive from the state capital of Cheyenne. The company distributes its malt to regional craft brewers, keeping Wyoming in local beers, too.

The tasting room at Pine Bluffs Distilling reflects its homegrown roots with a nod to the farm life that fuels its business. Belly up to the bar and sample the many varieties to help you choose which bottle to take home to remember your Wyoming adventure – and benefit the local makers of the West!

Pine Bluffs Distilling sources its ingredients literally from next door, allowing them to distill a collection of farm-to-flask whiskeys. Courtesy Visit Cheyenne

For more information on Cheyenne, visit Cheyenne.org.